• EXHIBITIONS

    2019 - TREBILCOCK

    Florescence


    Exhibition dates: 28 August - 15 September 2019

    FLORESCENCE            FLORESCENTIA

    Florescence is the blossoming and flourishing of flowers, as in the great florescence of poetry, music and art and the process of developing richly and fully.  In my sixth solo exhibition with Frances Keevil Gallery, I have produced a study of Australian native flowers, fruits and vegetables, filling the canvases, which celebrates the blossoming of springtime.

    The paintings are tactile, tightly focussed and rich vibrant colours, taking advantage of the varied shapes and decorative qualities of Australian flora and native foods.  The contemporary three-dimensional, heavily textured and large scale works aim to capture the light and shade of these subjects of nature, which I love to paint and which never fail to give me pleasure.

    The flowering of botany as a science in the 18th century produced a garden of English words that came about as adaptations of Latin words. Botanists picked florescence as a showy word to refer to the blooming of a flower-a good choice given that the term grew out of the New Latin florescentia, meaning "blossoming." Florescentia is related to the Latin verb florēre ("to blossom or flourish") and rooted in the Latin noun flos, meaning "flower." Less literal types appreciated the word, too, and applied it to anything that seemed to be thriving or flourishing, as in "the highest florescence of a civilization."

    FLORESCENCE            FLORESCENTIA

    Florescence is the blossoming and flourishing of flowers, as in the great florescence of poetry, music and art and the process of developing richly and fully.  In my sixth solo exhibition with Frances Keevil Gallery, I have produced a study of Australian native flowers, fruits and vegetables, filling the canvases, which celebrates the blossoming of springtime.

    The paintings are tactile, tightly focussed and rich vibrant colours, taking advantage of the varied shapes and decorative qualities of Australian flora and native foods.  The contemporary three-dimensional, heavily textured and large scale works aim to capture the light and shade of these subjects of nature, which I love to paint and which never fail to give me pleasure.

    The flowering of botany as a science in the 18th century produced a garden of English words that came about as adaptations of Latin words. Botanists picked florescence as a showy word to refer to the blooming of a flower-a good choice given that the term grew out of the New Latin florescentia, meaning "blossoming." Florescentia is related to the Latin verb florēre ("to blossom or flourish") and rooted in the Latin noun flos, meaning "flower." Less literal types appreciated the word, too, and applied it to anything that seemed to be thriving or flourishing, as in "the highest florescence of a civilization."