• EXHIBITIONS

    2013 - LOCKHART artist books

    New work & artist books


    Exhibition dates: 31 AUGUST - 22 SEPTEMBER 2013
    Opening: Saturday 31st August, 5 - 7pm

    The paintings are studio paintings. Paintings of studios. I spend a lot of time, naturally, in mine, but these works have been inspired by other artists' work places. Some people work in chaos, others have organized ateliers more akin to laboratories. Francis Bacon's was so fantastically disorganized it has been archaeologically disassembled, transported to Dublin from London and reassembled for posterity. Morandi's was simple, ordered and monastic just like his works. From a photo of Brice Marden's New York studio I have painted the bowl that sat on his table and put it in my picture Studio V. Other paintings include the imaginary corners of workbenches and tables, stacked with books and drawings. Here, I have aimed to capture light.

    The works on paper are mixed media. They are more gestural, based on the figure. The line is what is important to me in these works.

    I dived into the genre of artist books a few years ago and have found the creative possibility endless. It started with sketches, etchings and monotypes and then putting them into folios. They have ended up with one-off hand made pieces, reworked catalogues, novels used as sketchbooks, works with sculptural elements. Someone gave me an old Penguin paperback Of Mice and Men and I have filled the pages with pencil drawings of simple nudes of men and women.

    As I look at these books I see that they reflect my association with the printed word. At 14 I left school and got a job in the art department of the Launceston Examiner. I loved it. Drawing, designing, being mentored. Producing something today and seeing it in the paper tomorrow morning. But I also got to see how printing worked - the hot metal typesetting, the speed of the compositors, the hand at work. Today, technology reigns.

    In part, the craft of printing is kept alive today by people making their own books, using letterpress, hand binding and making objects to be kept and treasured. My books lean towards and honour this tradition.

    So this exhibition includes my familiar work of paintings and drawings and the new direction of artist books. I think that what they have in common is my search for an expression of life through light and line.
     
    The paintings are studio paintings. Paintings of studios. I spend a lot of time, naturally, in mine, but these works have been inspired by other artists' work places. Some people work in chaos, others have organized ateliers more akin to laboratories. Francis Bacon's was so fantastically disorganized it has been archaeologically disassembled, transported to Dublin from London and reassembled for posterity. Morandi's was simple, ordered and monastic just like his works. From a photo of Brice Marden's New York studio I have painted the bowl that sat on his table and put it in my picture Studio V. Other paintings include the imaginary corners of workbenches and tables, stacked with books and drawings. Here, I have aimed to capture light.

    The works on paper are mixed media. They are more gestural, based on the figure. The line is what is important to me in these works.

    I dived into the genre of artist books a few years ago and have found the creative possibility endless. It started with sketches, etchings and monotypes and then putting them into folios. They have ended up with one-off hand made pieces, reworked catalogues, novels used as sketchbooks, works with sculptural elements. Someone gave me an old Penguin paperback Of Mice and Men and I have filled the pages with pencil drawings of simple nudes of men and women.

    As I look at these books I see that they reflect my association with the printed word. At 14 I left school and got a job in the art department of the Launceston Examiner. I loved it. Drawing, designing, being mentored. Producing something today and seeing it in the paper tomorrow morning. But I also got to see how printing worked - the hot metal typesetting, the speed of the compositors, the hand at work. Today, technology reigns.

    In part, the craft of printing is kept alive today by people making their own books, using letterpress, hand binding and making objects to be kept and treasured. My books lean towards and honour this tradition.

    So this exhibition includes my familiar work of paintings and drawings and the new direction of artist books. I think that what they have in common is my search for an expression of life through light and line.